Monday Sept. 28, 2020
 
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e-Edition
Sept. 17, 2020

e-Edition
17 septembre 2020






REAL ESTATE LISTINGS




Upcoming events


SEPT 24 – ORLÈANS FARMER'S MARKET from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Ray Friel Centre parking lot on Tenth Line Road. Local farmers and artisans gather to offer their produce and artistic creations to the general public.

SEPT 26 – CUMBERLAND FARMER'S MARKET from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the R.J. Kennedy Arena on Dunning Road in Cumberland Village. The Cumberland Farmers' Market features a variety of local area producers bringing you fresh vegetables, seasonal fruits, specialty foods, homemade treats and a variety of artisan goods, on a weekly basis.

SEPT 26 – BREAKFAST AT THE ORLEANS LEGION from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Seating will be your choice.... outdoor patio (weather permitting) or inside lower hall. Families with children are welcome now that groups of 10 at the same table are permitted. As in the past, your order will be taken at your table and brought to you. Please make sure you have your mask since these are required when entering the premises. Come out and support your Legion!

 

 

Trying to live the new normal as pandemic enters 8th month
By Walter Robinson
Oct. 1, 2020

Try as we might, 2020 is the non-stop year of COVID-19. Whether it is the impact of the disease itself on family and loved ones, its continuing toll on local businesses and community organizations, or wall-to-wall media coverage, a part of me wants to put up the Christmas tree now, open some presents, then ring in the New Year and give 2021 a big hug.

Yet this little time slip fantasy would only bring us closer to much feared – if not inevitable – headlines noting that even with a vaccine or vaccines, mass immunization is still months away, a wave of personal bankruptcies and mortgage foreclosures is upon us, and up to one-third of our restaurant sector and one-fifth of other retail businesses have vanished. Sadly, this will get worse before it gets better.

On the bright side – and yes there is one – researchers and front-line clinicians know a lot more today and have some antivirals and other interventions to help patients with moderate- to severe-COVID-19 disease, especially in acute care settings. This has kept death counts for at-risk populations low even as the daily infection counts have risen.

As well, I’ve been impressed with the overwhelming compliance with indoor mask-wearing edicts, patient and well-spaced lineups from the grocery store to the ServiceOntario office on St. Joseph Blvd and a degree of comaraderie evident in Saturday afternoon LCBO waits. I’ve also seen kindness at the drug store prescription counter letting elderly clients skip the line and on local sidewalks as dog walkers take extra care with their pets around others – please, let’s keep this up!

On a personal level, our family did not have to agonize over the return to school. Our son is in his final semester of university and all classes are on-line. In chatting with friends and neighbours, the decision on returning to the classroom was not easy. Some kids need structure and sorely missed their classmates while others just rolled with the proverbial punches and have adapted quite well to hybrid or full stay-at-home learning.

My house backs onto a high school field and I can walk to three primary other schools within five minutes. On these walks it’s clear that teachers have been doing their best to use good weather to their advantage with outdoor teaching seeing younger kids sitting in well-spaced circles or teenagers appropriately seated on the football stands. Here’s hoping they can keep this up to Thanksgiving or beyond.

With the virus doing its thing or as one friend puts it, ‘virus gonna virus’, one strategy that has helped me tune out COVID-19 is to concentrate and devote my energies to things I can control.

Stepping up my game in the kitchen is a direct result of the early lockdown back in the spring and restricted opportunities to dine out. Another personal positive is the dents made to book piles in various corners of our house while discovering some new Canadian authors in the process.

Converting part of the garage into a mini gym has been a good counterbalance to my aforementioned LCBO visits. Although watching a middle-aged man do jumping jacks, push-ups, shadow boxing along with varied dumbbell sets while streaming old-school 80s and 90s hip-hop tunes through my Bose speaker has likely been a tad unsettling for the neighbours. Best to add a few bottles of wine and Scotch for the five houses around me on my next ‘beverages’ run.

Finally, with our trips to Florida and Europe scuttled (yeah I know, First World problem), we’ve toured local markets and towns all within an hour or so drive from Orléans and discovered great micro brewers, local food producers and talented artisans across Eastern Ontario and into the Gatineau Hills.

So control what you can, tune out the negative, and continue to be well. #InThisTogether #CaVasBienAller.

 

Entertainment

  Sports


Sir Wil’s 'Hunchback' a true masterclass in high school theatre

Missoula Children’s Theatre production a lesson in teamwork

St. Peter production an ode to 70s era disaster films


Ottawa TFC unveils fall/winter ‘Return to Play’ soccer program

The future is cloudy for Orléans speedskaters

Ottawa golf courses caught in coronavirus limbo

 
Local business

  Opinion

 


CEDAR VALLEY LEBANESE FOOD: Owners celebrate two years in business

 

SANTÉ CHIROPRACTIC & WELLNESS CENTRE: Where healthy people go

 

180-FITNESS CENTRE: Home of the Biggest Loser

 

 

 


VIEWPOINT: Back to school but hardly back to normal

 

WALTER ROBINSON: Lingering pandemic calls for patience, perseverance

 

Doug Feltmate: COVID-19 pandemic the final straw for troubled restaurant industry

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www.orleansstar.ca
745 Farmbrook Cres.
Orléans, Ontario K4A 2C1
Phone: 613-447-2829
E-mail: info@orleansstar.ca

 

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